THUNDER VALLEY LANDSCAPE DESIGN WORKSHOP AND GUIDELINES

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

“We must re-establish understanding and respect between our people and the planet by listening to the spirit of the place.” -Oyate Omniciye Oglala Lakota Plan, pg 189 

Thunder Valley CDC’s mission is to create an ecosystem of opportunity and a model of sustainable design for the Lakota people.  In support of this mission, Hoxie Collective, in collaboration with Hubbard Studio, hosted a community workshop to discuss the stories and significance plants hold in the lives of Lakota people. The workshop was centered on developing planting design guidelines based in Lakota culture and traditions. One of the questions that stimulated dialogue during the workshop was: What could people experience as a result of plant communities in a contemporary Lakota community?

The next step in Thunder Valley CDC's work with Hoxie Collective was to update their Design Standards, Guidelines, and Procedures to reflect the goals developed in the community workshop. (We added the soil science expertise of Syntax Design to the team for this process.) Our work entailed adding a new chapter on Plant Communities and Soil Health and additions throughout each chapter that incorporate regenerative landscape practices and connect to the new Plant and Soil resources when relevant. The purpose of the Design Standards, Guidelines, and Procedures document is to ensure that all projects with site impacts are mission-aligned, inclusive in their process, and embody high-quality design that is representative of Lakota values, culture, and tradition.  The Plant Palette and Soil Health appendices expand on expectations stated in this document. 

The Plant Palette is a curated list of almost 60 plants that function and add beauty. The document describes key considerations for developing plant communities that connect to Lakota culture, regenerate environmental health, and reflect the beauty of the place.

The Soil Health appendix provides information on the five interrelated soil health principles, challenges, strategies for fixing damaged soils, and procedures for employing the strategies. This diagrammatic guide also provides three key examples of challenges TVCDC is facing on their site. The examples show how to evaluate the problem through the lens of the five principles, which strategies should be employed and how to know if it's working.

We look forward to the next steps of Thunder Valley CDC's process to regenerate their landscape and the ripple effect of this new knowledge, on the larger Lakota community.

PROJECT DATA

Location

Porcupine, South Dakota

Year

2019 - ongoing

Client

Kimberly Pelkovsky

Thunder Valley CDC

Director of Design and Planning

kimberly@thundervalley.org

605.455.2700

Document Links

Design Standards, Guidelines & Procedures with Appendices located HERE

Plant Palette appendix only, located HERE

Soil Guideline appendix only, located HERE

Projects

Thunder Valley Regenerative Community Plan

-Master Planning (2012)

-Phase 1  Infrastructure Development (2015 - 2017)

-Housing Development  by Pyatt Studio (2017 - 2019)

-Northeast Area Conceptual Design (2018)

-Play Area Renderings (2019)

Thunder Valley Landscape Design Workshop and Guidelines

- Thunder Valley Landscape Design Workshop: Fostering Lakota Culture Through Landscape Design (2019)

- Landscape Guidelines, Plant Palette and Soil Health  (2020)

Team

Hoxie Collective 

Elise Hubbard, Hubbard Studio

Hilary Noonan, Syntax Design

LANDSCAPE DESIGN WORKSHOP

PLANT PALETTE AND SELECTION GUIDE

SOIL HEALTH GUIDE

SOIL PRINCIPLE EXAMPLE

The image below shows an in-depth look at The Living Root, the first of five soil principals. For more information and to see the other five soil principles described fully please see the complete Soil Guide appendix document HERE

PROBLEM SOLVING EXAMPLE

© 2019 | All Rights Reserved

  • Facebook
  • Instagram